Designing For The Multi-Generation & Nuclear Family

September 2012

Not  many  years  ago  we  as  a  society  were  classified  in  our  housing  as  an  integrated  multi  generational  family  unit.  Beginning  in  the  1950′s  that  type  of  family  matrix  started  shifting  to  what  we  have  been  living  with  and  classified  as  a  more  nuclear  family  unit.  Confused?  Let  us  explore  these  family  classifications  and  understand  how  they  relate  to  the  home  we  inhabit.

Integrated  multi  generation  families  are  simply  just  that,  i.e.  with  multiple  generations  of  the  same  family  occupying  the  home.  Grandparents,  aunts,  uncles,  mother,  father,  several  children  and  even  their  children  in  many  family  units  were  the  ”norm”  in  America  during  the  years  prior  to  the  1950′s.  The  children  in  most  families  never  ventured  far  from  the  ”home  place”  often  living  out  their  lives,  raising  their  family  and  retiring  in  the  same  county  or  city  where  they  were  born.

Starting  in  the  50′s  and  60′s  as  a  society  we  became  more  mobile  and  started  the  longer  distance  separation  from  the  family  core  unit.  Multi  generation  housing  and  the  requirements  for  the  home  changed  dramatically  to  meet  the  new  dictates.

The  nuclear  family  may  consist  of  a  mother  and  or  father  with  or  without  children.  This  unit  requires  a  completely  different  approach  to  designing  their  space.  This  family  may  be  totally  separated  by  many  miles  from  their  family  core  unit  with  other  members  of  the  family  occasionally  saying  over  for  a  short  visit.  This  home’s  sheltering  requirements  will  have  a  bedroom  for  mom  and  dad,  possibly  a  bedroom  for  each  child,  and  a  bedroom  for  guests.  One  eating,  kitchen  area  is  the  ”norm”  for  this  family.  In  most  homes  we  have  also  evolved  into  one  family  gathering  space.  Very  possibly  an  office  space  will  be  required  for  this  family.  The  small  house  that  we  work  with  today  must  consider  this  space  to  expand  and  compress  to  respond  to  family  needs  as  we  defin  the  space.  The  one  thing  that  we  as  designers  and  homeowners  overlook  in  many  homes  is  to  allow  for  considerations  of  separation,  individual  privacy,  multi  age  level  activity,  and  sound  transfer.  Let’s  explore  the  positive  and  indeed  the  negative  of  each  classification  and  how  it  is  related  to  the  design  of  your  home.

The  separation  issue  is  one  of  unique  and  very  important  consideration  when  exploring  the  family  unit  and  the  activities,  ages,  and  personal  priorities  for  each  member.  When  interviewing  a  client  prior  to  actually  designing  any  part  of  the  home,  I  ask  each  member  of  the  family  questions  ranging  from  what  type  of  food  the  family  prepares  and  who  the  chef  is  most  of  the  tme.  I  make  it  a  habit  to  explore  the  activities  of  each  family  member.  Does  the  family  entertain  at  home  and  with  whom?  The  list  of  inquiries  is  extensive  and  when  complete  I  will  know  much  about  how  this  family  will  live  in  the  house  during  thei  daily  routine.   Separation  of  space  doesn’t  mean  that  each  member  of  the  family  has  a  separate  room  from  which  to  isolate  themselves.  Simply  stated  a  separation  of  activities  i.e.  watching  television  is  not  being  interrupted  with  multiple  other  activities  from  different  age  groups  such  as  a  teenager  practcing  on  the  drums  or  a

similar  activity.  Creating  separate  areas  within  a  home  again  doesn’t  mean  more  walls,  rather  a  separation  of  distance  and  placement  of  the  rooms.

Individual  privacy  can  be  a  very  daunting  requirement  when  designing  a  smaller  home,  but  most  certainly  achievable.  The  mom  is  my  first  target  of  questioning,  as  she  normally  multi‐tasks  much  more  than  the  other  members  of  the  family.  She  is  usually  going  like  a  ”house  on  fire”  from  the  time  she  hits  the  floor  until  she  falls  into  bed  at  the  end  of  the  day.  I  get  tired  just  listening  to  their  schedule  and  don’t  know  how  they  continue  daily.  Considering  the  role  of  each  family  member  and  the  level  of  activity  each  do  on  a  daily  routine  is  of  paramount  concern  prior  o  putting  ”pen  to  paper.”

The  lady  of  the  house  in  many  homes  simply  doesn’t  have  ”her”  space  to  simply  rest,  read  and  “revitalize”.  This  space  may  be  for  her,  the  breakfast  room,  a  space  in  the  office  nook,  or  even  retiring  to  the  master  bedroom  ”alone.”  She  needs  this  time  and  that  special  space  to  call  her  own.  I  have  created  a  private  nook  off  the  master,  separate  space  adjacent  to  the  laundry,  a  tiny  loft  area  complementing  the  stairwell,  and  many  other  ”my  space”  areas.  These  important  areas  don’t  require  great  expense,  just  some  creative  thought  and  listening  skills.  I  believe  multi‐level  activities  are  mostly  confined  to  the  separation  of  the  ages  of  the  family  unit  and  their  personal  lifestyle,  age  specific  requirements,  and  social  activities.

Take  as  an  example  a  home  of  mother,  father,  two  sons  (11  and  9)  and  one  daughter  five;  we  can  clearly  see  the  personality  and  the  required  lifestyle  each  person  contributes  to  the  family  matrix.  The  dad  may  be  an  engineer  who  likes  to  golf,  participates  with  the  boys  sports,  and  wants  a  space  to  totally  unwind  after  the  workday  ends.

The  two  boys  probably  share  most  of  the  same  interests  except  the  11  year  old  needs  separation  from  the  9  year  old,  and  that’s  tough  because  they  share  the  same  bedroom  and  bathroom.  According  to  the  boys,  the  little  ”princess”  has  her  own  room  and  is  enjoying  ”Calico  Critters”  and  ”American  Girl”  in  her  room  and  occasionally  sharing  these  items  all  over  the  house.  The  children  of  this  family  are  an  integral  part  of  the  unit  and  all  of  their  daily  requirements  must  be  designed  to  have  a  leel  of  tranquility  that  each  of  us  yearn  for  in  our  home.

The  mother‐Oh  yes,  I  didn’t  forget  her  important  role  here;  but  I  discussed  briefly  above  her  level  of  activity.  After  all,  she’s  going  like  a  ”house  on  fire”  and  engaging  with  each  person  in  their  room,  pushing  each  one  out  the  door  well  prepared  for  their  day.  Fortunately  or  unfortunately,  many  mom’s  are  also  heading  out  the  door  to  pursue  their  career  and  add  to  the  income.  This  is  more  the  ”norm”  today  and  another  important  consideration  for  this  very  important  family  member.  Okay  guys,  you  are  an  ”extremely”  important  family  member  too;  but  I  challenge  you  to  swap  roles  for  two  weeks.  Let  me  assure  you  it’s  brutal  and  an  adventure  few  men  want  to  take  on!

You  are  probably  questioning  how  all  of  these  subjects  of  thought  process  onto  the  drawing  board  and  eventually  make  up  the  spae  allocation  of  your  home.  Simply  put,  each  question  answered  to  these  and  many  more  subjects  are  all  parts  to  the  whole.  The  exploration  of  each  family  member  and  the  lifestyle  each  want  to  enjoy  daily  are  all  very  important  to  how  your  home  will  ive.

The  nuclear  family  is  one  unto  itself.  Conversely  the  multi  generational  family  unit  consists  of  several  ages  and  the  individual  personality  and  space  requirements.  The  example  of  the  multi  generational  house  is  not  for  a  family  matrix  of  yesterday,  rather  a  contemporary  family  of  today.  With  the  universal  bad  economic  environment  and  more  specifically  our  own  country’s  economic  conditions  of  the  past  few  years   believe  we  are  returning  toward  multi  generation  family  unit.

We  all  know  of  families  with  children  that  can’t  find  employment  after  college,  parents  that  need  close  supervision,  healthcare  and  housing.  We  may  have  witnessed  more  than  one  family  sharing  one  housing  unit.  These  are  conditions  not  to  be  ashamed  of,  but  rather  planned  for  as  the  ”new  norm”  in  family  planning  for  the  home.  When  we  ”take  in”  a  family  member  that  we  didn’t  plan  for  it  can  and  most  likely  will  apply  stress  to  the  nuclear  family  unit.  Putting

grandmother  into  the  guest  room  may  be  the  only  alternative;  but  if  there’s  an  option  like  creating  her  own  ”apartment”  over  the  garage,  etc.  it  would  be  a  much  better  alternative  and  will  allow  her  the  dignity  of  separation  and  the  privacy  she  will  require.  I  have  worked  with  this  scenario  several  times  and  when  possible,  creating  a  separate  living  area  for  the  family  member  always  creates  a  better  long  term  relationship  for  all.

Many  developments,  subdivisions,  county  building  codes,  and  cities  simply  don’t  allow  co‐housing.  Investigate  your  codes  and  guidelines  carefully  prior  to  the  planning  stage  of  this  adventure.  Always  plan  for  the  unexpected,  prepare  for  change,  and  carefully  explore  the  options  presented  to  us  in  life.  We  can’t  possibly  understand  or  even  respond  to  all  of  the  challenges  we  can  encounter  on  this  journey  of  life,  but  we  can  at  least  visit  most  of  them  with  the  right  attitude.  The  ”what  if”  factors  should  always  remain  in  our  constant  awareness  and  additionally  be  explored  with  a  very  positive  approach  in  renderinga  solution.

Additionally,  I  will  emphasize  again  that  the  dream  home  your  family  will  occupy  doesn’t  have  to  be  expansive  or  large  to  accommodate  the  chllenges  that  I’ve  addressed  here.  Ask  the  tough  questions  of  your  individual  family  listen  thoroughly  to  the  answers  offered  by  all  and  respond  accordingly.  Should  the  professional  design  team  that  you’ve  retained  not  approach  the  family  unit  requirements  written  in  this  article  andmany  more,  it  is  your  ultimate  goal  to  bring  these  and  more  into  the  design  process.

When  we  approach  any  task  or  journey  with  as  much  education,  knowledge,  and  understanding  of  what  the  task  involves  and  more,  we  will  enjoy  our  journey.  Never,  ever  surrender  to  regret!  Take  the  necessary  steps  to  assure  success  and  live  in  the  home  your  family  designed.

Should  you  have  any  questions  or  want  to  discuss  anything  further,  please  do  not  hesitate  to  contact  me!

Until  next  time  enjoy  the  process!

 

Ken  Pieper

KEN  PIEPER  AND  ASSOCIATES,  LLC

Author: Dianne Pieper